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A missing tooth (or teeth) that have not been replaced or substituted is the most prevalent cause of bone loss, while other potential reasons exist.

Teeth naturally lodged in the jawbone promote bone formation when biting and eating. Bone resorbs when teeth fall out, and the jawbone stops receiving the stimulation it needs to grow new teeth.

Without a new tooth or any dental restoration by a dentist in Kings Mountain, NC, the jawbone will continue to atrophy and lose 25% of its mass in the year following a tooth extraction.

In what ways does one’s bone mass deteriorate?

Here are some of the most prevalent reasons why jawbones deteriorate and eventually fall out:

  • Extractions of teeth

Biting and chewing are two behaviors that use natural teeth to promote bone formation. The jawbone resorbs and degrades when a tooth is pulled without a replacement since it no longer receives the necessary stimulation.

  • Gum disease

Gingivitis and periodontitis are severe gum infections that erode the bone structure and inflict soft tissue damage to the teeth.

The majority of cavities and gingivitis originate from dental plaque. Tartar, a complex, porous substance, can form when plaque, readily prevented with daily brushing and flossing, is not removed. The gums can get inflamed, red, swollen, and easily bleed from this, which can happen above or below the gumline.

When gingivitis goes untreated, it can lead to periodontitis and other severe gum disorders, which weaken the bone and gums that support the teeth. The gradual deterioration of bone density can cause adjacent teeth to become loose and eventually fall out.

  • Dental implants or bridges

Dentures that rest loosely on the gum line may depend on the jawbone’s existing structure for stability, but they do not constantly stimulate the jawbone directly.

Loose dentures get their name because, without regular stimulation, the bone can resorb and degrade, making it more difficult for the user to eat and speak normally. Untreated bone loss can progress to the point where dentures become loose, even with stronger adhesives, and a new set of dentures may be necessary.

  • The effects of trauma

Jawbone loss can happen if a tooth is knocked out or injured to the point where it can not stimulate biting or chewing. Jaw fractures, knocked-out teeth, fractured or chipped teeth, and other common traumas often occur as a result of sports-related injuries.

  • Displaced placement

When teeth are out of alignment, they no longer stimulate the jawbone directly since there is no opposing tooth structure. This can lead to bone loss. Natural chewing and biting abilities might be compromised due to misalignment concerns, such as TMJ, wisdom teeth erupting, inadequate treatment, or plain old wear and tear. The gradual absence of direct stimulation might lead to bone loss.

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General Blog

Tuesday, Apr 23, 2024